Acacia

(ancient name). Leguminbmz, tribe Mimo sew. Shrubs or trees: lvs. twice-pinnate, of many leaf lets, or reduced to phyllodia or leaf-like petioles, as in Figs. 8 and 9 (except the earlier lvs. of young seedlings, and occasionally those on robust shoots) : tls. yellow or white, minute, in conspicuous globular heads or cylin drical spikcs, axillary, solitary or fasciculate, or diffusely paniculate at the ends of the branches; stamens very many, exserted. Australia(chiefly); afew in N. and S. America, N. and S. Africa and Asia. Ours Australian unless otherwise stated. -Prop. by seeds sown under glass as soon as ripe, or by cuttings of half-ripened wood taken with a heel, in summer; the seeds should first be placed in hot water and left to soak 24 hours. The bark of most of the Australian and of some other species (especially A.p_1/cmmtha, A. mollissima and A. decurrens) abounds in tannins, which may eventually make their cultivation profitable in the southwest. For outdoor planting in Calif. and the S., keep in pots until large enough to place in permanent quarters, for they do not transplant well. Several African species yield the gum arabic of commerce, especially A. Senegal. Mono graphcd in part by Baron von Mllller in his iconography of Australian Acacias, cited here as F. v. M. Icon. J. Bonn‘ Davr.