Asperula

-roughi-sh ; referring to lvs.). Rubidceaz. Mostly dwarf, ardy herbs, for borders, rockeries and shady places, with square stems, whorled lvs. (some of the lvs. are really stipules), and many small, 4-parted fls., produced freely from May to July. The commonest species is A. odorala, the Waldmeister of the Germans, which is used in their Maitrank, or May wine, and in summer drinks. The dried lvs. have a hay-like fra grance, lasting for years, and are often kept with clothes. The plant occasionally escapes from gardens. A. heacaphylla, with its delicate, misty spray, is used with sweet peas and other cut-flowers that are inclined to look lumpy. Other plants for this purpose are Gyp sophila paniculata, Sfatice latifolia, and several Gali ums, all of which have small, abundant fls. in very loose panicles on long, slender stems. In half-shaded and moist soil, Asperulas grow very luxuriantly until late fall. in dry and sunny places they soon become stunted, and die down before the season is over. Prop. by divi sion and by seeds.