Broussonetia

(after T. N. V. Broussonet, a French naturalist). Urlicdceer. Trees or shrubs: lvs. decidu ous, alternate, petioled, large: fls. dioacious, incon spicuous, apetalous, the staminate in cylindrical, nod ding catkins, with 4-parted calyx and 4 stamens, the pis tillate in globular heads: collective fr. globular, consist ing of small fleshy nutlets. Three species in E. Asia, and there often cultivated, the bark being used for paper-making. Ornamental trees with broad, round heads, but under culture often shrubby, of vigorous growth when young, and effective by its large, often deeply lobed foliage, not hardy north oronly in very shel tered positions. They thrive best in rich, somewhat moist soil and sheltered positions. Prop. by seeds, sown after maturity or in spring, by greenwood cuttings under glass, or by cuttings of ripened wood, kept in colder climates during the winter in the greenhouse ; also by root-cuttings and layers. Budding in summer or graft ing in early spring in the greenhouse is sometimes practised. Known as Paper Mulberries. papyrilera, Vent. Tree, 30-50 ft., with thick, pubes cent branches: lvs. long-petioled, usually cordate-ovate, acuminate, coarsely dentate, often deeply lobed, espe cially on younger plants, rough above, pubescent be neat , 3-8 in. long: fr.-heads %in. across, red. Ma . China Jap. B.M.2858.—Many varieties. Var. sac - lata, Ser. (B. nariculdris, Lodd.). Lvs. small, curled upward. Var. laciniata, Ser. Lvs. deeply lobed and in cised. Decorative form, but more tender than the type. Var. macrophylla, Ser. Lvs. large, usually undivided. Kalinoki, Sieb. (B.K¢impfen', Hort.). Branches slen der, glabrous at length: lvs. short-petioled, ovate or ovate-oblong, nearly glabrous, only somewhat rough above, entire or 2-3-lobed, 2-8 in. ong: fr.-head less than )6 in. in diam. China, Jap.—'I‘his species is more tender than the former, which is also cultivated some times as B. Krrmpleri, while the true B. I\'a’mpIen', Sieb., with the lvs. resembling in shape those of B. Kazinoki, but much smaller and pubescent, and with very small fr.-heads, seems not to be cultivated. Anraan Rsnnaa.