Chive

Allium Schoendprusum, Linn., a perennial plant native to Europe and the northern borders of the U. S. and northward. See Allium. The leaves of Chive are used green as a seasoning in soups, salads, and stews; but, like other vegetables of this class, it is little known in America. Chive grows 6 to 8 inches high, making dense mats of narrow, hollow leaves, and blooming freely in violet-colored heads, which scarcely overtop the foliage. The plant makes an excellent permanent edging and is worth growing for this purpose alone. It is easily propagated by dividing the clumps; but, like other tufted plants, it profits by having the stools broken up and replanted every few years. It rarely seeds. It thrives in any garden soil. The leaves may be cut freely as they quickly grow again.