Colocasia

Perennial herbs with cordate-peltate lvs., which are often handsomely colored in cultivation. Differs from Alocasia and Caladium in floral characters: spadix terminating in a club-shaped or subulate appendage destitute of stamens. Species5. Tropics. Monogr. by Engler, DC. Phaner. Monogr. 2: 490. Colocasia includes the plants known as Caludium es culenlum, which are much grown for subtropical bedding. C. odorala (which is an Alocasia) has very large, thick stems, which may be wintered over safely without lvs.,or at most with 1 or 2, the stems, to save space, being placed close together in boxes. C. esculenta rests during the winter and is kept undera greenhouse bench or anywhere out of the reach of frost or damp. Rich, damp ground suits both kinds. Of easy culture. Consult Caladium for treatment. Colocasias furnish the much-cultivated Taro of the Pacific tropics, this edible product being the large, starchy roots. From it is made the Poi of Hawaii. In Japan and other countries the tubers of Colocasias are much cultivated, and are handled and eaten much as we use potatoes (see Georgeson, A.G. 1892:81). The young lvs. of some kinds are boiled and eaten.