Doodia

Named after Samuel Doody. Polypodiaceae. A small genus of greenhouse ferns from Ceylon, Malaya and New Zealand. Sori curved, placed in one or more rows between the midribs and the margins of the pinnae.

A. Leaves pinnate

Aspera Leaves: 6-18 in. long, 2-4 in. wide, pinnatifld, the lower pinnae gradually becoming smaller: sori in 1 or 2 rows. Australia. Crested varieties occur in cultivation.

AA. Leaves pinate in the lower half

Media, Leaves: 12-18 in. long, with pinnae 1-2 in. long, the lower ones gradually smaller. Australia and New Zealand. D. Kunthidna, from the Hawaiian lslands, has close central pinnae. D. supérba, is a larger garden form.


Caudata, Leaves: 6-12 in. long, with pinnae about an inch long, the spore-bearing ones shorter; apex often terminating in a long point. Australia and New Zealand.


According to Schneider's Book of Choice Ferns, all Doudias, except-D. blechnoides, are of dwarf habit, and are useful for fern-cases and for edgings of window boxes, especially for northern aspects, where flowering plants do not prosper. Cool and intermediate temperatures are best. They are excellent for forming an under growth in cool houses, as they are seldom infested with insects, endure fumigation, and do not care whether their taller neighbors are syringed or not. Schneider recommends 3 parts of peat and one of silver sand. Loam does not help, but a little chopped sphagnum does. They are very sensitive to stagnant water, and do not like full exposure to sunlight. Always prop. by spores, but division is possible.

In the American Florist, 12:142, "A.H." writes: “D. aspera: and its crested variety are most useful, but they can hardly be recommended as market ferns. They re~quire similar treatment to the Blechnums, and are seen at their best in a 4-inch pot. The young fronds have a very bright tint, which livens up the more somber hue of the older fronds. They lose the bright tint much more quickly when allowed to get too dry. Being of slender growth, care should be taken not to over-pot. They like plenty of leaf-mold and peat in the compost, and good drainage."