Your cart
Close Alternative Icon

Green Valley Supply's Gardening Encyclopedia

Convallaria (Lily of the Valley)

Convallaria (Lily of the Valley)

(From the Latin convallis, an enclosed valley)

Convallaria majalis

English Names: Lily-of-the-valley, Conval lily, May or Park lily, Wood lily, May blossom.

Small, white, globular, bell-like, and very fragrant flowers, hanging daintily from graceful flower stalks six to twelve inches long. The leaves grow from the base of the plant, are smooth, rather broad and lily like,

and preserve their clean fresh character throughout the summer. A favorite flower for naturalizing under trees and in shady places, but excellent for ground covering or in the herbaceous border under shrubs, where, if the ground be properly enriched, it will thrive in full sun. Good for cutting. A perfectly hardy perennial of easiest culture. Old beds are liable to run out and not flower profusely, and so should be replanted every few years, though if the soil is enriched and is given a dressing of manure every fall, the bed will thrive for four or five years. Succeeds best in partial shade. Propagate by division in fall or early spring.

Continue reading

Chelone (Balmony)

Chelone (Balmony)

(From the Greek cfulone, a tortoise, in allusion to the resemblance of the flower to a reptile's head)

Chelone Lyonii

English Names: Balmony, Turtle head, Turtle bloom, Shell flower, Bitter

herb, Cod head, Fish mouth, Snake head.

Curiously shaped, rosy-purple flowers in dense, showy, terminal and axillary spikes, borne over two feet high on thickly growing stalks. Leaves handsome, deep green, glossy, elongated, heart-shaped, largest at base of plant; persistent. A profusely blooming plant which forms thick clumps. Excellent for planting in moist situations and in the herbaceous border. A hardy perennial of easy culture in good garden soil, preferably rich and moist. Prefers partial shade. In the ordinary border the roots should be covered during the growing season with a heavy mulch, four or five inches thick, of well-rotted manure. This will feed the surface roots and protect the plant from drought. Propagate by seed, cuttings, or by division in the spring.

Continue reading

Cerastium tomentosum (Snow-in-Summer)

Cerastium tomentosum (Snow-in-Summer)

(From the Greek keras, a horn, referring to the shape of the pod)

English Names: Snow-in-summer, Mouse-eared chickweed.

Small white flowers carried about six inches high on rather weak, creeping stems. Leaves roundish-oblong, downy and silvery, whence the name " mouse-ear." Good for covering dry, sunny places, for the rock garden, or for edging the herbaceous border. The flowers though pretty do not make much of a display; the chief value of the plant lies in its silvery foliage which preserves its freshness and neatness throughout the summer, its cool appearance being especially attractive in August. A perfectly hardy perennial in any soil. Prefers a dry situation and full exposure to the sun. Propagate by cuttings or by division.

Continue reading

Centaurea (Knapweeds)

Centaurea (Knapweeds)

Centaurea montana

English Names: Perennial cornflower, Mountain bluet, Bluebottle, Bachelor's

buttons, Blue bonnets, Mountain knapweed, Corn centaury, Break-yourspectacles.

Large, flat blue flowers which turn purple as they grow old, two or more inches in diameter, resembling the cornflower, profusely carried on erect unbranching stems one to two feet high. The leaves are pointed-oval and, when young, downy white. Compact dwarf plants, good for the herbaceous border and for cutting. A hardy perennial of easy culture in any good garden soil. Prefers sun. Var. alba. Similar to the type with white flowers. Excellent though sometimes rather grayish in color. Var. rosea. Similar to the type, rose-colored flowers. Var. citrlna (sul phur ed). Flowers yellow with brown centres, not so good as the type.

Continue reading

Campanula (Bellflowers)

Campanula (Bellflowers)

(From the Latin campanula, a little bell)

English Names: Carpathian harebell, Bellflower.

Large, erect, purple-blue cup-shaped flowers an inch and a half across, carried on delicate branching stems six to twelve inches high. Leaves pointed-oval, somewhat heart-shaped, with wavy edges, forming very neat and dainty clumps; persistent. Unexcelled for the rock garden or for edging the herbaceous border, good also for cutting.

A hardy perennial of easy culture, especially in the Northern States, in any rich, well-drained garden soil. Prefers sun. Propagate by seed, cuttings, or by division. Var. turbindta (Turban bellflower). Dwarfer and more compact than the type, with purplish blue flowers more bellshaped and often two inches across, largerleaves, and less erect habit.

Continue reading

Callirhoe (Poppy Mallows)

Callirhoe (Poppy Mallows)

(The name of several women in Greek mythology)

English Name: Poppy mallow.

Large, mallow-like flowers varying from rose to cherry-red and crimson-purple, with white centers, carried nine to twelve inches above the ground on creeping stems. Leaves rather large, round in outline, and palmately divided; persistent. Excellent for bare places and for the rock garden, and good for the front of the herbaceous border.

A perfectly hardy perennial of easiest culture, will grow well in ordinary soil, but does best in a light, rich soil. Prefers sun. Propagate by seed, from which it will blossom the first year, also by cuttings. Thrives even in very dry soil, the roots penetrating to a great depth.

Continue reading

Boltonia

Boltonia

(Named from the English botanist, James Bolton, 18th century)

English Name: False chamomile

Large, rosy-lavender, asterlike flowers with yellow centres, carried in profusion on tall, much-branching leafy stems, from three to six feet tall. Foliage bright green, pointed-oval, very like that of the Asters, from which this plant differs only in technical characteristics. Very at tractive in rough places or at the back of the herbaceous border, though it sometimes proves troublesome there as it spreads very rapidly. Excellent also for cutting.

Low-growing Asters, hardy Chrysanthemums, or other suitable plants should always be planted in front, as the stems do not branch near the ground and the lower part is apt to look bare and weedy. A perfectly hardy perennial of easiest culture in any soil, even though poor and dry, though it responds readily to good soil and does well in moist situations. Prefers sun. Propagate by division.

Continue reading

Baptisia (Blue False Indigo)

Baptisia (Blue False Indigo)

English Names: False indigo, Blue wild indigo, Blue rattle bush.

Large pea-shaped blue flowers, nearly an inch in length, in long terminal spikes, rising from a bushy plant to a height of three to five feet. Foliage sea-green, roundish-oval leaves in groups of three. Lasts in good condition through August, after which the foliage blackens. This is undoubtedly the best species of Baptisia in cultivation on account of its good habit and showy, well-colored flowers.

An excellent plant for the herbaceous border, though it should always be so placed that its unsightliness in late summer will not be noticeable. A hardy perennial of easy culture in any ordi nary soil. Prefers free exposure to sun. Propagate by seed or by division.

Continue reading

Ajuga (Bugleweed)

Ajuga (Bugleweed)

(From the Latin a, not, and jugare, to yoke; because the calyx is not bilabiate)

English Names: Bugle, Bugle Weed, Carpenter's herb, Middle comfrey,
Middle consound, Sicklewort, Dead man's bellows, Helfringwort, Wild mint.

NUMEROUS small blue flowers carried in erect spikes, from six to twelve inches high, on creeping leafy stems. Foliage oval and glossy, forming a dense ground covering. A very fast-spreading creeper useful for covering shady slopes. A hardy perennial of easiest culture in any common soil; will grow in sun or shade.

Propagate by seed or by division. Var. rubra. More commonly cultivated than the type, on ac count of its dark pur plish leaves; its flowers are blue like those of the type. Var. variegata (shown in the photograph) has leaves splashed and edged with creamy yellow. Not so good as the type.

Continue reading

Agrostemma (Corncockle)

Agrostemma (Corncockle)

English Names: Mullen pink, Dusty miller, Rose Campion, Gardener's eye.

Large circular flowers, an inch and a half across, varying from white to rich crimson, borne singly on the ends of stems which fork toward the top of the plant and reach a height of one, to two and one half feet. The leaves are long and oval, somewhat like those of the mullen; leaves and stems woolly throughout, of a pale silvery color and persistent, though after the blooming season the plant is considerably lower than when in bloom. A common plant in old gardens and very effective for herbaceous borders or for the rock garden, the flowers, es pecially the darker shades, forming a striking contrast with the whitish foliage. A hardy perennial or self-sowing biennial of easiest culture in ordinary garden soil. Prefers sun. Propagate by seed.

Continue reading
Recent posts
Sulfur
Magnesium
Calcium
Phosphorus
Potassium